Training Plans 

FREE DOWNLOADABLE Training Plans (in PDF format) are here!  Click on the best one that describes your current fitness level & goals and follow the plan to your 13.1-mile race:

  • Beginner – intended for new athletes or first-time half marathoners who can train 3-5 days/week and have set a goal to finish 13.1 miles within the 3-1/2 hour time limit.

  • Beginner PR – intended for new athletes or first-time half marathoners who can train 4-6 days/week and have a specific goal time to finish 13.1 miles.

  • Working Professional – intended for athletes with a moderate level of base fitness who can train 3-5 days/week and have set a goal to finish 13.1 miles within the 3-1/2 hour limit.

  • Working Professional PR – intended for athletes with a moderate level of base fitness who can train 3-5 days/week and have a specific goal time to finish 13.1 miles.

  • Personal Best – intended for athletes with a moderate to high level of base fitness who would like to train 4-6 days/week and finish 13.1 miles with a personal best time.

  • Personal Best + Track – intended for athletes with a moderate to high level of fitness who would like to train 4-6 days/week and finish 13.1 miles with a personal best time.  Includes track workouts to maximize speed.

Training Tips

Hydration Tips 

  • Hydrate before you run so your body can transfer heat (cool down) as efficiently as possible, so be sure to drink plenty of water and/or electrolytes before you run.

  • Hydrate regularly during your run. Drinking smaller amounts of fluids more frequently can help your body absorb the liquids. Plan in advance how often you will hydrate during your race based on your training, writing down how frequently took in fluid and the amounts you consumed.

Downhill Running Tips 

  • Keep a slight lean forward so your shoulders are in front of your hips. Most runners tend to lean backwards as they are afraid of “falling” forward as they descend. The problem with this approach is it increases the eccentric demand on your quadriceps and diminishes the activity of your gluteus maximus muscles which are – or should be! – the workhorse of a runner.

  • Don’t over stride; keep a quick turnover to prevent from over reaching which creates a “braking motion” and increases pounding.

  • Visualize staying “light” on your feet and let gravity guide you down the course.

Apparel Tips

Staying comfortable as you run can positively affect your performance. Here are some basic tips when deciding what to wear on race day:

  • Don’t try anything new on race day, no matter how cool it looks, tastes or feels at the Expo!

  • Be sure that you are familiar with the electrolyte drink &/or gels that will be used at the race.  It is always best if you train with the products that you will use on race day. You can always bring and carry your own water bottles and/or gels, if necessary.

  • Break in your running shoes well before race day – always wear them for at least several long training runs before racing in them.

  • Seek assistance to find the best socks/shoes until you find ones that you can run comfortably in & that don’t cause blisters.

  • Wear a comfortable top that is made of a moisture wicking material. Avoid cotton tops that simply absorb sweat instead of pulling moisture away from your body.

  • Don’t overdress, even if it’s cool the morning of the race. Generally, it will feel 10 or more degrees warmer once you start running.

  • Female runners should invest in a sports bra and, for males, if you are running more than 10 miles – wear band-aids to avoid chaffing.  Also, products like “Bodyglide” can really save areas of skin that rub or chafe when you run.

  • Use sunscreen. Even if it’s cloudy, UV rays still cause sunburn. Non-greasy sport versions of your favorite sunblock will help you not ‘sweat it off’.